• $600 million in general obligation bonds: $100 million of taxable debt will help with the cost of legal settlements expected to be paid out in 2016 and 2017, $150.5 million of tax-exempt debt for “E-Note” or equipment purchases in 2016 and 2017, and $237.2M of tax-exempt debt for capital spending in 2016 and 2017. While the total comes to $487.7M, the remaining portion of the $600M authorization is to cover the cost of borrowing and issuance fees.

  • $3.2 million in police-related settlements: The larger of two payouts, $2.2 million, will go to the family of Emmanuel Lopez, a 23-year old fatally shot by police officers during a car chase in September 2005. And a $1 million payout to the family of Ryan Rogers, fatally shot by Chicago police in suburban East Hazel Crest in March 2013 during an undercover operation targeting stolen cell phones.

  • Mayor’s new Neighborhood Opportunity Bonus which would revamp the entire density bonus system and create a new fund that would support development projects in some of the city’s most underserved neighborhoods (details are below in the Zoning Committee story).

  • A requirement that the head of the Independent Police Review Authority (IPRA) appear before the Finance Committee when police-related settlements are up for consideration. Chairman Burke said “if and when there is a successor agency”, the ordinance would be amended to include the new agency head. Mayor Emanuel recently announced he would move to replace IPRA.

  • A requirement that the Police Superintendent refer all cases involving the death of a suspect in custody to the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office. The ordinance would codify into law what the police directive already mandates.

  • A so-called “Debt Transaction Accountability Ordinance” from the council’s Progressive Caucus that would require a “more rigorous evaluation and more meaningful public scrutiny” of the city’s future debt offerings.

  • A proposal from Mayor Emanuel banning those under 18 from using tanning salons, allow anyone 18 and up to get tattoos, and require those under 18 who would like to get a lip or tongue piercing to have a parent sign an official form issued by Public Health Commissioner Julie Morita.

  • A proposal from Mayor Emanuel, Ald. Carlos Ramirez-Rosa (35) and others that would make leaving pet waste on your own private property a fineable offense.

  • Two introductions from the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH): one clarifying city code on low-risk restaurants that issue self-inspections for food safety. The other, part of the city’s Healthy Chicago 2.0 initiative, calls for policymakers to apply a health lens to all law making, and creates a cross-department task force to examine how the city can address short, medium, and long term recommendations for changes to policies, practices, and procedures to improve community health.

  • The appointment of Juan Linares to the 15-member Chicago Low Income Housing Trust Fund Board. Linares is the Executive Director of LUCHA, a Northwest Side organization that focuses on affordable housing. He briefly served on the city’s Plan Commission

  • The appointment of Lucino Sotelo, a Chief Marketing Officer at BMO Harris Bank, to the city’s Plan Commission, to replace Linares.

  • The appointment of Barrett Murphy to serve as the city’s Water Commissioner.

  • The appointment of Patricia G. Perez to the Chicago Public Library Board. Perez is the former Executive Director of law firm Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg, and served as Director of Administration at several other large Chicago law firms.

  • The sale of the former Leland Elementary School.

  • An intergovernmental agreement with the Cook County Sheriff’s Office to trade use of two city-owned backhoes and a wood chipper for the County’s Restoring Neighborhoods Workforce Program (RENEW) in exchange for use of Cook County Jail inmates to serve as Sheriff’s Work Alternative Program (SWAP)